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Mount Whitney Trail Guide Climbing Mount WhitneyHiking in the Sierra Nevada - Lonely Planet California - Lonely Planet  California - Rough Guide  Yosemite & Sequoia NP - Lonely Planet  Yosemite & Sequoia NP - Rough Guide  SW USA - Lonely Planet  


Mount Whitney and the Crest of the Sierra Nevada


Driving due south through the arid scrub of Owen's Valley in the rain-shadow of California's Sierra Nevada I turned off at the small, backcountry town of Lone Pine and continued beyond the outcrop of huge boulders of the Alabama Badlands ( the setting for many western movies ) to encamp amid prickly-pear cactii in the foothills of Mt.Whitney - the highest summit of the contiguous states of the USA.

Approach to Mt. Whitney from Lone Pine

Approach

to

Mt. Whitney

The following afternoon I headed across the desert scrub and up the well-graded trail through fragrant pine and fir forest to the trailhead of Whitney Portal. A returning climber advised that although there was heavy snow cover on Mt. Whitney there was little risk of avalanche and he had reached over 10,000 feet .

Back at my tent something had chewed a hole in the groundsheet and gorged itself on a loaf of bread. Outside a chill wind blew but Orion and the Great Bear featured prominently in a clear, star-spangled sky.

Before dawn next morning I drove up to Whitney Portal on the winding mountain road still officially closed for the winter and strewn with large, jagged fragments of rockfall.

Donning climbing boots and gaiters I set off along the John Muir Trail leading to the Crest of the Sierra Nevada and onwards across the Great Western Divide to terminate in Sequoia National Park.

An easy angled path led upwards through frosted pine trees beneath high granite cliffs. Initially, rapid progress was possible on hard-packed snow but with increasing depth the crust would occasionally, and unexpectedly, break and I would sink deep into soft snow making progress difficult and tiring. Snow shoes would have been ideal. In Sequoia National Park at the start of my Californian circuit I had used a pair for the first time on a foray into the snowbound wilderness of the High Sierra but there had been none for hire in Lone Pine.

Beyond the forested foothills and across the yellow-ochre scrubland and white, salt pans of Owen's Valley the sun had risen above the blue-black ridge of the Inyo mountains transforming the surrounding winter landscape into a dazzling, sparkling snowscape beneath azure-blue skies.

Snow Bound Mirror Lake

Snow bound

Mirror Lake

Surmounting a rise I reached a perfectly flat snow-field covering Mirror Lake in a picturesque setting amid fir trees beneath a high cirque of rugged cliffs. A short but steep climb at the back of the corrie through deep, soft snow brought me above the tree-line and onto an open, wind-swept plateau with a hard, icy surface. In its present, deserted, snowbound state it was hard to believe that it was a popular camping site for summer backpackers. Boulder strewn slopes swept up to a high, jagged skyline.

Mt. Whitney in Springtime

Mt. Whitney

in

Springtime

Heading into a bitingly cold wind and streaming spindrift I continued across the gradual gradient of the plateau and past two other frozen lakes towards a large amphitheatre enclosed by sheer rock walls. I was encouraged to see another solitary climber plodding his way uphill.

At the far end of the plateau, directly beneath great, vertical precipices, a broad, steep, snow-filled gully led up to a breach in the ridge.

Strapping on crampons I started the climb. At first conditions were perfect and it was easy to kick steps but higher up the angle increased with sections of hard, blue-ice. Foreshortening moreover had given a false impression of the height of the gully and the skyline still seemed a long way off. I was beginning to suffer from the altitude.

Climbing to the Crest of the Sierra Nevada

Climbing

to the

Crest

of the

Sierra Nevada

Nearing the top I caught up with Chris, from Los Angeles, who had camped overnight at Mirror Lake where two friends awaited his return.

A rising traverse across soft snow brought us to twin rock pillars and it was then only a matter of minutes before we gained the ridge, the "Crest of the Sierra Nevada", at a height of 13,777 feet - and a superb outlook.

On the Crest of the Sierra Nevada

On the

Crest

of the

Sierra Nevada

To the west the ridge plunged into a deep, broad canyon. On the far side, beyond an enormous escarpment, arose the snow-capped, saw-toothed summits of the Great Western Divide. Below us, to the east, lay a vast amphitheatre with its huge snow bowl enclosed by towering, granite cliffs and rugged, angular buttresses. In the far distance beneath the Inyo mountains stretched the long trench of Owen's Valley .

A path led off along the ridge towards the hidden, 14,495 feet, summit of Mt.Whitney, the most frequently climbed peak in the USA during summer months. Unfortunately in springtime we were out of time - the condition of the snow in the heat of the noon-day sun was rapidly deteriorating and giving cause for concern.

After a final appreciation of the magnificent mountain scenery we reluctantly started on the 5,000 feet descent back to Whitney Portal.


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Mount Whitney Trail Guide Sierra Nevada Map - Yosemite, Sequoia, Whitney Climbing Mount Whitney

California - Lonely Planet  California - Rough Guide  Yosemite & Sequoia NP - Lonely Planet  Yosemite & Sequoia NP - Rough Guide  SW USA - Lonely Planet  SW USA - Rough Guide

Rough Guide Yosemite Yosemite an American TreasureAnsel Adams - Yosemite & High Sierra Day Hikes in Yosemite Rock Climbing - Yosemite Free ClimbsAnsel Adams - Yosemite Frommers Yosemite & Sequoia Best Easy Day Hikes in Yosemite

Let's Go USA Rough Guide USA Lonely Planet USA Lonely Planet: Driving thru America Rough Guide SW USA Lonely Planet SW States Let's Go SW USA SW USA: Insight Flexi Map Rough Guide - SW USA

Lonely Planet: Hiking in the USALet's Go California Rough Guide California Lonely Planet: California & Nevada Day Hikes in Sequoia and Kings CanyonFalcon Hiking in Sequoia and Kings Canyon50 Best Short Hikes in Yosemite and SequoiaSW USA & Las Vegas - DK Eyewitness GuideSW USA: Driving Guide

Lonely Planet USA Independent Travellers USA 2003 Lets Go 2004 USA Road Trip USA Road Trip - California & the SW USA SW USA & Las Vegas101 Hiking Tips

Backpackers HandbookBackpackers Field Manual Backpacker Magazine Wilderness TrainingWilderness SurvivalBackcountry Skier - Guide to Ski Touring

Solo Hiking EssentialsComplete Climbers Handbook Hiking in the Sierra Nevada - Lonely Planet Yosemite National Park - Lonely Planet Outside Magazine Los Angeles Map San Fancisco Map Las Vegas - Rough Guide







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