Accounts and photographs of walks, climbs and treks in some of the world's most spectacular mountain landscapes


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Mountaineering in the UK

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For a land that never rises more than 1344 metres above sea level, it could be argued that Great Britain punches above its weight when it comes to mountaineering.

The great British expeditions
to Mount Everest of the early 20th century culminated in Tenzing and Hillary being the first to reach the summit in 1953. Today, Leo Holding and friends are pushing the limits of what is possible and inventing new ways of exploring the high places of the earth. Where does this appetite for adventure come from?

It may stem from our unquenchable love of the great outdoors, championed and articulated by the likes of Wainwright and Munro in the 19th and 20th centuries, during a time when nature was being upheld as something that was life giving and to be treasured. Perhaps this was a reaction to the rapid spread of industrialisation at that time, often at the expense of nature. Whatever it was, our passion has led to a conservation movement that has created the formation of national parks, helping to preserve our right and privilege to enjoy the mountainous parts of Britain today.

Ben Nevis above Fort William and Loch Linnhe




We love to get out on the hills in spite of our unpredictable and sometimes dreary weather, which can make for some tricky climbing and navigation conditions. However, it makes British mountains a fantastic training ground for the larger elevations around the rest of the world. Ascents in the UK range from the top-class sports climbing of the Peak District to the mixed ice climbing of the Nevis range.

In addition to its benefits in training the mountaineer, it`s important to appreciate the brooding beauty of the mountains in bad weather. They are a sight not to be missed when half-shrouded in low-lying cloud or when ribbons of white water cascade down their flanks after a downpour.

Snowdon ( Yr Wddfa ) - 1085 metres - highest mountain in Wales

Snowdon - the highest mountain in Wales and

the highest mountain in the UK south of the Scottish Highlands




Staying in bothies, bunk houses or cottages in Snowdonia
of North Wales, the Cairngorms of Scotland or the Lake District of Cumbria, one is brought closer still to the local way of life. It`s a great way to become familiar with the environment because our national parks are not solely there to preserve the mountain wildernesses alone. They also preserve the architecture, culture and working practices associated with those areas. With comfortable beds, drying rooms and usually a roaring fire, these kinds of lodging are a great place to return to in order to recharge your batteries and prepare your gear for another charge up the slopes in the morning.

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